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Get dinner on the table in 30 minutes with sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and vegetables! #familyfriendly #healthyeating #sheetpanmeal | https://www.roseclearfield.com

Welcome to my newest food obsession: sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and vegetables. How did I not know that this was a thing until very recently?

Broccoli and cauliflower for sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage. #roastedvegetables #broccoli #cauliflower | https://www.roseclearfield.com

Shockingly, sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and vegetables is another meal idea that was inspired by Jessica of How Sweet Eats.  (This is not the first time I’ve shared a recipe here where I got a base ingredient from Jessica.) I know, I talk about Jessica all the time on this blog like she’s my friend, which might bug some people. Her recipes are amazing, and she shares a lot of great recommendations – beauty products, baby/toddler toys, Nordstrom gift picks, and cookbooks to name a few. When I saw her sheet pan gnocchi recipe this winter, I knew that I had to try baking gnocchi.

Let me be clear that this is not Jessica’s recipe. As soon as I saw the idea for baking pre-made, refrigerated gnocchi, I started experimenting with a couple of different ingredient combinations. I’m still hoping to nail at least one more sheet pan dinner with gnocchi. But sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and vegetables was the clear initial winner, so that’s what I’m sharing now.

Ready to make sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage, broccoli, and cauliflower! A healthy, family-friendly meal. #weeknightdinner #sheetpanmeal #healthyeating | https://www.roseclearfield.com

It’s not a secret that I love roasted vegetables or chicken sausage. I’ve been roasting Brussel sprouts and cauliflower for years. It wasn’t until much more recently than I started roasted broccoli regularly, too. I like steamed broccoli. A lot. (I know. I’m one of those annoying people who eats roasted vegetables often and doesn’t hate it.) But I like roasted broccoli so much better. I like it so much better than I’m not sure when I’ll be making steamed broccoli again at home any time soon.

Sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and veggies, ready for the oven! #healthydinner #quickdinneridea #sheetpanmeal | https://www.roseclearfield.com

The combination of the garlic-y roasted vegetables and crisp gnocchi is so good that you may even convert your family members who don’t love veggies or potatoes. No, I didn’t get my toddler son to eat broccoli or cauliflower. Sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and vegetables is good, but I can’t claim that kind of victory. And my husband doesn’t love sweet chicken sausage like I do. So if I make this for dinner (instead of for a week of lunches), I make it with Andouille, which works for everyone. So we’re calling it a win.

Roasted, crispy sheet pan gnocchi, chicken sausage, broccoli, and cauliflower. #sheetpandinner #healthyeating #chickensausage | https://www.roseclearfield.com

While I love quick dinners (especially in this stage of life with a toddler), I have not jumped on the sheet pan dinner bandwagon. One, I’m inheritantly weary of anything trendy. A little obnoxious, yes, but it’s true. Two, it’s tough to find good flavor combinations that cook at the same time and temperature. Frankly, I think most sheet pan dinner recipes don’t quite cut it.

30-minute, family-friendly sheet pan meal: roasted gnocchi, chicken sausage, broccoli, and cauliflower #30minutemeal #healthydinner #weeknightcooking | https://www.roseclearfield.com

Normally I would say that this recipe is easy to switch up and make your own with favorite veggies, ingredients you have on hand, etc. I think in time, I will find other combinations that work and will be sure to share them here. But it’s tough to get the vegetable flavor pairing just right when you add gnocchi and sausage into the mix. And again, you’re working with the whole single time and temperature factor, so some ingredients just won’t work. As such, think about making substitutions with care.

Sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and vegetables is quick and healthy! The perfect weeknight dinner. #healthyeating #weeknightdinner #sheetpanmeal | https://www.roseclearfield.com

With that being said, there are a couple of ways you can create a little variation. First, you can opt to omit the chicken sausage to make the dish vegetarian. I’m posting this dish during Lent, so think about that if you want a meat-free lunch or dinner! If you wanted to add one more veggie to the mix, asparagus is a good option. Second, for any other day, you can leave out the sausage and cook the dish alongside another meat, such as chicken breasts, tilapia, or pork chops, which is usually what I do. Then it’s not a true sheet pan dinner, I know. But it’s still part of a very quick, healthy meal.

Healthy, family-friendly dinner that comes together in 30 minutes: sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage, broccoli, and cauliflower. #healthy #sheetpanmeal #gnocchi | https://www.roseclearfield.com

Print Recipe
Sheet Pan Gnocchi with Chicken Sausage and Roasted Vegetables Yum
Sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and roasted vegetables is a simple variation for preparing pre-made skillet gnocchi. You have a delicious sheet pan meal that comes together in 30 minutes!
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Course Main Dish
Prep Time 10-15 minutes
Cook Time 15-20 minutes
Servings
4 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 16 oz. package pre-made skillet gnocchi found in the refrigerated pasta section
  • 1-2 small broccoli florets chopped
  • 1/2 head of cauliflower chopped
  • 2 cooked chicken sausage chopped
  • extra virgin olive oil to coat the gnocchi, sausage, and veggies thoroughly
  • garlic powder for a generous coating over the gncocchi, sausage, and veggies
  • salt and pepper to taste
Course Main Dish
Prep Time 10-15 minutes
Cook Time 15-20 minutes
Servings
4 servings
Ingredients
  • 1 16 oz. package pre-made skillet gnocchi found in the refrigerated pasta section
  • 1-2 small broccoli florets chopped
  • 1/2 head of cauliflower chopped
  • 2 cooked chicken sausage chopped
  • extra virgin olive oil to coat the gnocchi, sausage, and veggies thoroughly
  • garlic powder for a generous coating over the gncocchi, sausage, and veggies
  • salt and pepper to taste
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Spray the aluminum foil with a generous coat of non-stick cooking spray.
  3. Chop the broccoli, cauliflower, and chicken sausage into bite-sized pieces.
  4. Arrange the vegetables, gnocchi, and sausage in an even layer on the prepared baking sheet. Coat them generously with extra virgin olive oil.
  5. Sprinkle the entire pan generously with garlic pepper. Finish the vegetables, gnocchi, and sausage with salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Bake for 15-20 minutes, stirring once during cooking. I stir at 10 minutes and then check again at 15 minutes. You want the gnocchi to be crispy and the vegetables and chicken sausage to be browned but not burnt.
  7. Serve immediately.
Recipe Notes

This recipe is easy to half or double or even triple, depending on the number of people you're serving. Plan to use at least two baking sheets if you're doubling the recipe.

Extra servings of sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and veggies will keep in the fridge for lunch or dinner the rest of the week. Store leftovers in an airtight container and consume within a week.

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Quick, family-friendly dinner idea: sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and veggies. #sheetpandinner #kidfriendly #30minutemeal | https://www.roseclearfield.com

You’re eating dinner in 30 minutes, and you only have one pan to clean (and barely because of the aluminum foil covering). Another win.

Did you make the sheet pan gnocchi with chicken sausage and vegetables?

I want to see it! Tag your images #RoseClearfield on Instagram or Twitter.

More weeknight dinner recipes:

Classic sloppy joes come together in just 20 minutes and serve the whole family. The recipe is perfect for busy weeknights when you need a simple, delicious dinner. | https://www.roseclearfield.com

20-Minute Classic Sloppy Joes

Pizza Calzones with Sausage, Pepperoni, and Onion | https://www.roseclearfield.com

Pizza Calzones With Sausage, Pepperoni, and Onion

Ground Beef Chili with Corn | https://www.roseclearfield.com

Slow Cooker Ground Beef Chili With Corn

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10 Myths About Open Adoption Debunked

10 Myths About Open Adoption Debunked | https://www.roseclearfield.com

I’ll be honest: when my husband and I began the adoption process, we never imagined that we’d have an open adoption that went beyond sending monthly updates and pictures via email and visiting occasionally. I don’t discuss our relationship with Tommy’s birth family in much detail publicly to protect their privacy. But it’s an important part of our lives and involves a lot more contact than what I just described. As such, I’ve fielded a lot of questions addressing myths about open adoption and will continue to do so. I’m debunking 10 of the most common myths about open adoption.

1. Open adoption confuses children.

The single biggest myth about open adoption seems to be that it confuses children. This concept blows my mind because I’ve absolutely never heard a case where open adoption confused children. Even very young kids understand who their parents are and the role that their parents fulfill for them. As birth families play a very different role in adopted children’s lives, there’s no confusion about these roles. Most adoptive families use language such as “birth family” or “first family” to refer to their child’s birth relatives to avoid any potential confusion with their adopted kids as well as friends and family.

2. Open adoption increases the risk of birth families trying to take back adopted children.

Thanks to cheesy Hallmark and Lifetime movies and all of the other pop culture that paints a blatantly false picture of adoption, people truly believe that open adoption compromises an adoptive family’s rights and safety. In short, it doesn’t. Adoptive families in open relationships have exactly the same legal rights as adoptive families in closed relationships. I’m sure that there are occasional instances of birth families kidnapping adopted children, but it’s extremely rare. In the event that it does happen, it’s considered kidnapping and is treated as such.

3. Birth families don’t matter and as such, don’t deserve an open adoption.

Birth families are some of the strongest people I know. There aren’t words that adequately describe the strength that goes into the decision to put up a child for adoption and then have that child as part of their lives through open adoption. This decision is made out of nothing but love for the child and the future they desire for him/her. On the flip side, birth families allow adoptive parents to become parents and grow their families. There isn’t a day that goes by that an adoptive family isn’t grateful for the sacrifices that their birth families made for them. To say that birth families don’t matter belittles this entire relationship.

4. Open adoption is a type of co-parenting.

Similiar to the concern about open adoption confusing children, I’m not sure how people even begin to believe that there are open adoptions where the families co-parent. Adoptive parents don’t seek out open relationships with birth families so they can co-parent with them. In turn, birth parents don’t seek out open relationships with adoptive families because they see it as an opportunity to co-parent. Both families understand their roles in the relationship. Many birth families are extremely grateful to be in the adoptees’ lives and wouldn’t dream of trying to step on the adoptive parents’ toes.

5. Adopted children will feel as though they have to choose between their adopted family and their birth family.

When adoptive families approach open adoption from a healthy perspective (and most do), adoptees will never have to choose between their adopted family and birth family. Again, in the vast majority of circumstances, both parties understand their role in the relationship and will work together to support the child. Inevitably, there will be occasional conflict, challenge, jealousy, and hurt feelings. The same is true in any family dynamic. Working through these issues together is a natural part of the relationship.

6. Most adopted families regret the decision to have an open adoption.

Typically, neither an adoptive family nor a birth family enters the adoption process with a clear idea of what open adoption will look like. It’s natural to be apprehensive about the process, especially in the beginning when it’s all unfamiliar and you don’t know each other very well. As adoptive families get to know birth families and see the relationship that their children form with them, they quickly understand the importance of open adoption. As in any relationship, there will be seasons where open adoption is tough. This doesn’t mean that it isn’t worth it.

7. Open adoption increases the risk that adopted children will want to go live with their birth families someday.

I don’t know any kid, biological or adopted, who hasn’t expressed a desire to live with another family member, friend, etc. at some point. Parents drive you crazy. And the grass is always greener. When the going gets tough, living with someone else looks great. Yes, if a birth family is in an adopted family’s life, an adoptee may make this threat. There are virtually no circumstances where an adopted child actually goes to live with a birth family.

8. Adoptive families benefit from open adoption relationships, not birth families.

Both adoptive and birth families benefit from open adoptions. Needless to say, this relationship helps provide answers to numerous questions for adopted families. As an adopted parent, being able to answer these questions for your child is one of the greatest gifts you’ll ever be able to give them. With that being said, open adoption relationships answer a lot of questions for birth families, too. They also provide a huge peace of mind.

9. Open adoption relationships eventually fall apart.

Over time, relationships develop and change. Expecting an open relationship to look exactly the same over the course of an adoptee’s life simply isn’t realistic. It’s natural for people to grow closer or further apart or to have varying life circumstances that prevent them from seeing each other as often as they once did (new job, illness), etc. An adoptee will also go through natural periods where he/she is or isn’t especially close with his/her birth family. Through high school and college years, many kids would rather make time to go out with their friends than their family, which includes their birth family.

10. Open adoption is the right decision for every adopted family-birth family relationship.

Even with all the benefits of open adoption, it isn’t the right decision for every adoptive family. Certain circumstances in a birth parent’s life (i.e., in prison, substance abuse) may not make it beneficial for adopted children to spend time with their birth families. Many birth parents and adoptive parents simply aren’t comfortable with an open relationship. It’s important for both parties to be comfortable with the relationship for it go well. Additionally, not all adoptees desire to know their birth families. This may be tough for their adopted parents and birth families. However, ultimately, it’s adoptees’ decision, especially as they get older.


 

[Disclaimer: The above book links are affiliate links. Thanks for your support!]

Adoptive parents, as always I’d love your input!
What other common myths about open adoption have you encountered?

Leave me a comment with your insight!

More adoption resources:

10 Things No One Tells You About Adoption | https://www.roseclearfield.com

10 Things No One Tells You About Adoption

10 Things Not to Say to Adoptive Parents | https://www.roseclearfield.com

10 Things Not to Say to Adoptive Parents

Adoption Doesn't Fix Everything | https://www.roseclearfield.com

Adoption Doesn’t Fix Everything

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20 Months of Tommy

In the Tropics: The Orchid Show at the Chicago Botanic Garden | https://www.roseclearfield.com

This past week our Tommy turned 20 months old.

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Spring Embroidery Hoop Wreath Decor

Spring embroidery hoop wreath decor: spring wreath made from embroidery hoop and book pages via My Creative Days | https://www.roseclearfield.com

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Switching up a wreath in a living room or entryway is a simple way to transform the decor for a new season or holiday. I love using new or vintage embroidery hoops to create simple, festive wreaths. An embroidery hoop paired with green florals and a whimsical element, such as a book page, adds a cheery touch to your home. I’ve rounded up just a few of my favorite spring embroidery hoop wreath decor ideas. Happy decorating!

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30 Healthy Ramen Noodle Recipes

30 Healthy Ramen Noodle Recipes | https://www.roseclearfield.com

We all know that Ramen noodles are amazing. Unfortunately, they aren’t the best for you, especially the included flavor packets. The good news is that there are so many healthy Ramen noodle recipes out there. Everyone has simple hacks to boost the nutrition in Ramen noodles while still keeping them delicious and quick to prepare. Jessica’s 15-minute sesame Ramen (#1 on the list) remains my favorite, but I’m slowly branching out and adding a few more to my regular rotation. This round up of 30 healthy Ramen noodle recipes will help you mix up your lunch and dinner routine for weeks to come. Enjoy!

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